Stay Current

Biennial Flight Review

Stay current and enhance your flying skills with the mandatory Flight Review, previously known as the biennial flight review (BFR). As per the United States Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) regulations, every active pilot certificate holder must undergo this review at least once every 24 calendar months.

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Program Overview

The Flight Review is designed to ensure that you maintain the highest standards of aviation proficiency and safety. It consists of a comprehensive assessment, including a minimum of 1 hour of ground instruction and 1 hour of in-flight training conducted by a qualified flight instructor.

The great news is that the Flight Review is not a pass or fail test; it is an opportunity for you to demonstrate your knowledge and skills as a pilot. The FAA and instructors emphasize that it’s a collaborative process aimed at enhancing your capabilities, not a judgment of your abilities.

The duration of the Flight Review is flexible, and its length depends on your level of preparation, knowledge, and piloting skills. Embrace this chance to showcase your expertise and dedication to safe and proficient flying.

Upon successful completion, your logbook will be endorsed to signify that you have fulfilled this essential requirement, further reinforcing your commitment to aviation excellence.

At ActivePILOT, our experienced instructors are here to guide you through the Flight Review process, ensuring you feel confident and prepared for the assessment. We understand the value of continuous learning and improvement, and our team is dedicated to helping you succeed in maintaining your pilot certificate.

BFR Syllabus

1.5 Hours of Ground Instruction

You will sit down with one of instructors for a review of the current general operating and flight rules of CFR 14 Part 91.

1.5 Hour of Flight Instruction

You will fly with one of instructors for a review of those maneuvers and procedures that, at the discretion of the person giving the review, are necessary for the pilot to demonstrate the safe exercise of the privileges of the pilot certificate.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is a bi-annual flight review (BFR) for pilots?

The bi-annual flight review, also known as the Flight Review, is a mandatory assessment required by the United States Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) for all active U.S. pilot certificate holders. It must be completed at least once every 24 calendar months to ensure pilots maintain their proficiency and safety standards.

How often do I need to complete the Flight Review?

The FAA requires pilots to undergo the Flight Review every 24 calendar months to maintain the validity of their pilot certificate.

What does the Flight Review consist of?

The Flight Review consists of a minimum of 1 hour of ground instruction and 1 hour of in-flight training conducted by a qualified flight instructor. It aims to assess and enhance a pilot's knowledge and flying skills.

Is the Flight Review a pass or fail assessment?

No, the Flight Review is not a pass or fail test. Instead, it serves as an opportunity for pilots to demonstrate their proficiency and receive valuable feedback from the instructor. The goal is to improve the pilot's abilities, not to judge their performance.

Can I perform the Flight Review with any certified flight instructor?

Yes, you can undergo the Flight Review with any qualified and certified flight instructor authorized by the FAA to conduct this assessment.

Can I take the Flight Review even if I have not flown recently?

Yes, the Flight Review is designed to refresh and assess your skills, even if you have not flown for a while. It serves as an excellent opportunity to regain confidence and proficiency.

What happens if I don't complete the Flight Review within the required timeframe?

Failure to complete the Flight Review within the 24-month timeframe will result in the suspension of your pilot certificate until the review is successfully conducted. It is crucial to stay current and comply with FAA regulations to ensure your pilot privileges remain active.

Program Requirements

Exemptions

Flight Instructors

When you pass a practical test conducted by an examiner for the issuance of a flight instructor certificate, an additional rating on a flight instructor certificate, renewal of a flight instructor certificate, or reinstatement of a flight instructor certificate, you do not need to complete a flight review.

Additionally, suppose you hold a flight instructor certificate, and within the period specified in FAR 61.56(c), satisfactorily completed a renewal of a flight instructor certificate under the provisions in FAR 61.197. In that case, you do need not accomplish the one hour of ground training specified in FAR 61.56(a).

Each of these exemptions renews your 24-calendar month currency. After this, you need to complete a flight review or fall under a new exemption to maintain currency.

FAA Pilot Proficiency Programs

If you’ve accomplished one or more phases of an FAA-sponsored pilot proficiency award program in the past 24 calendar months, you do not need to complete a flight review.

The most common pilot proficiency program you’ll use is FAA WINGS. Completion of any Phase of WINGS satisfies the requirement for a flight review. You will complete a review of common weak areas that have led to accidents and end up with a flight review too!

FAA Medical

To exercise the privileges of a private pilot license, you must hold a third-class medical certificate, which can be obtained through an aeromedical examiner (AME). This should be done early on in training as you will not be able to solo an airplane without your medical certificate.

Certificates must also be renewed periodically. If you are under the age of 40, this is every 60 months. While if you are over the age of 40, you must renew your medical certificate every 24 months.

Proficiency Checks and Practical Tests

You don’t need to complete a 24-month flight review if you’ve passed a practical test or pilot proficiency check conducted by an examiner, an approved pilot check airman, or a U.S. Armed Forces, for a pilot certificate, rating, or operating privilege. Here are a just few examples of applicable exemptions:

  • Passing a recurrent Checkride under Part 135/121.
  • Adding a type rating to your pilot certificate.
  • Passing a practical test for a new pilot certificate (private pilot, commercial pilot, etc.).
  • Adding a multi-engine or instrument rating to your pilot certificate.

Each of these exemptions renews your 24-calendar month currency. After this, you need to complete a flight review or fall under a new exemption to maintain currency.

Start with an Introductory Flight

Get your first experience of taking off, flying, and landing an airplane with a certified flight instructor by your side. Later, meet the team and current students to ask all the questions you have about becoming a pilot.

Start with a Virtual Consultation

Our Zoom consultations are the most convenient way of answering all your questions about starting your flight training to becoming a pilot. Zoom consultations are free of charge, but we require advance scheduling.